Aurora borealis

aurora borealis

What are the aurora borealis?

Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) The Aurora Borealis (commonly referred to as the Northern Lights) are the result of interactions between the Sun and Earths outer atmosphere.

Are Aurora Borealis dangerous to humans?

Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) Although harmless to life on Earth, the Aurora can cause power disruptions in satellite communications and in radio/TV broadcasts. Aurora Displays: The northern latitudes (or southern latitudes in the southern hemisphere) see the greatest occurrence of the Aurora.

How do Aurora Borealis move around the Earth?

Auroras Borealis generally move around in an ellipse around the Planet’s Magnetic Pole, that has a different place than the North Geographical Post, being a little offset and also closer to North of Canada. North light can be a common thing and also with a regular occurrence for the people staying in far northern latitudes.

What are the chances of seeing the aurora borealis at different latitudes?

In the northern hemisphere, there is a 50% or greater chance of seeing Aurora roughly between the latitudes of 55 to 80 degrees north. This means in general that in these latitudes, the Aurora should occur on at least half of the nights throughout the year.

What are Northern Lights or aurora borealis?

The lights which are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern hemisphere are called Northern lights or Aurora Borealis. The Northern Lights are formed as a result of collisions between charged particles released from the sun and gaseous particles in the Earth’s atmosphere.

What is the science behind the aurora borealis?

The aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights, is one of the most spectacular displays in the night sky. What is the science behind these ethereal curtains of light? The sight filled the northern sky; the immensity of it was scarcely conceivable. As if from Heaven itself, great curtains of delicate light hung and trembled.

What is the difference between Aurora Australis and Aurora Borealis?

The southern counterpart, the aurora australis or the southern lights, has features almost identical to the aurora borealis and changes simultaneously with changes in the northern auroral zone. The aurora australis is visible from high southern latitudes in Antarctica, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia.

How often does the aurora borealis occur in the northern hemisphere?

In the northern hemisphere, there is a 50% or greater chance of seeing Aurora roughly between the latitudes of 55 to 80 degrees north. This means in general that in these latitudes, the Aurora should occur on at least half of the nights throughout the year. However, this also varies.

How do auroras move?

NASA’s THEMIS Sees Auroras Move to the Rhythm of Earth’s Magnetic Field. In this unstable environment, electrons in near-Earth space rapidly stream down magnetic field lines towards Earth’s poles. There, they interact with oxygen and nitrogen particles in the upper atmosphere, releasing photons to create the aurora.

What causes the aurora borealis to appear?

The waves travel down the magnetic field lines in Earth’s atmosphere. These field lines converge at the magnetic poles and is why the aurora borealis glows most remarkably there. And this is where it interacts with oxygen, nitrogen and other elements with a dazzling display of lights in the sky.

What are Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights)?

Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) The Aurora are constantly changing and moving in streams of light or curtains, because the process of how the Suns ionized gas interacts with the Earths magnetic field is very dynamic. Although harmless to life on Earth, the Aurora can cause power disruptions in satellite communications...

Do Auroras happen on other planets?

Auroras are not just something that happen on Earth. If a planet has an atmosphere and magnetic field, they probably have auroras. We’ve seen amazing auroras on Jupiter and Saturn. These swirls of red light are an aurora on the south pole of Saturn. Image courtesy of NASA/ESA/STScI/A.

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