Calisto lua

calisto lua

Is a base on Callisto the future of space exploration?

The study proposed a possible surface base on Callisto that would produce rocket propellant for further exploration of the Solar System. Advantages of a base on Callisto include low radiation (due to its distance from Jupiter) and geological stability.

When was Callisto discovered?

Callisto was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei. At 4821 km in diameter, Callisto has about 99% the diameter of the planet Mercury but only about a third of its mass. It is the fourth Galilean moon of Jupiter by distance, with an orbital radius of about 1 883 000 km.

What is Callisto the goddess of?

Callisto was a nymph (or, according to some sources, the daughter of Lycaon) who was associated with the goddess of the hunt, Artemis. The name was suggested by Simon Marius soon after Callistos discovery. Marius attributed the suggestion to Johannes Kepler.

What is the geology like on Callisto?

The ancient surface of Callisto is one of the most heavily cratered in the Solar System. In fact, the crater density is close to saturation: any new crater will tend to erase an older one. The large-scale geology is relatively simple; there are no large mountains on Callisto, volcanoes or other endogenic tectonic features.

Is Callisto the best place to build a base?

Because of its low radiation levels, geologic stability, and large abundance of water ice, Callisto has long been considered the most suitable place for a human base for future exploration of the Jovian system. Artists impression of a base on Callisto.

What spacecraft has studied the moon Callisto?

Galileo orbited Jupiter until the mission ended in 2003. Since then, several NASA spacecraft, including Cassini and New Horizons, have studied the moon, taking images of its surface and gathering other data. Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Callisto and Jupiter’s other three large moons: Ganymede, Io and Europa.

What is Callisto known for?

Callisto is the second largest moon in the Jovian system and the third largest in the solar system. Because of its low radiation levels, geologic stability, and large abundance of water ice, Callisto has long been considered the most suitable place for a human base for future exploration of the Jovian system.

Is Callisto a real Moon?

Callisto, a moon of Jupiter, has been a subject in both science fiction and scientific speculation for potential future human colonization. Callisto is the second largest moon in the Jovian system and the third largest in the solar system.

When was Callisto discovered? Callisto was officially discovered by Galileo Galilei on the 8th January 1610, along with the other Galilean moons of Jupiter — Io, Europa and Ganymede. The discovery of Callisto and the other moons of Jupiter not only had astronomical but religious implications.

How big is Callisto?

Callisto was named Jupiter IV. This numeric system was used until the mid-1800s when the satellites were given their mythological names. It was decided this would be best as the numerical system would become very confusing as new moons were being discovered. How did Callisto get its name?

Who is Callisto in Greek mythology?

Callisto (mythology) In Greek mythology, Callisto or Kallisto ( /kəˈlɪstoʊ/; Ancient Greek: Καλλιστώ [kallisˈtɔː]) was a nymph, or the daughter of King Lycaon; the myth varies in such details. She was one of the followers of Artemis, or Diana for the Romans, who attracted Zeus (Jupiter).

How did Callisto become a virgin?

As a follower of Artemis, Callisto, who Hesiod said was the daughter of Lycaon, king of Arcadia, took a vow to remain a virgin, as did all the nymphs of Artemis. According to Hesiod, she was seduced by Zeus, and of the consequences that followed:

How did Callistos family become devoted to Artemis?

Callistos family were devoted followers of Artemis, the goddess of the hunt. As part of her devotion, Callisto promised Artemis that she would remain a virgin her whole life. Then along came Zeus.

What is Kallisto in Greek mythology?

In Greek mythology, Callisto or Kallisto (/kəˈlɪstoʊ/; Ancient Greek: Καλλιστώ [kallistɔ̌ː]) was a nymph, or the daughter of King Lycaon; the myth varies in such details. She was one of the followers of Artemis, or Diana for the Romans, who attracted Zeus (Jupiter).

Postagens relacionadas: