Apod.nasa.gov.archive

apod.nasa.gov.archive

What does APOD stand for?

A1: APOD stands for the Astronomy Picture of the Day. We abbreviate this as APOD instead of ApotD because APOD sounds better (spoken: AYE-pod). Q2: How can I easily see yesterdays APOD? A2: Click the < less than sign < at the left of todays APOD link line (near the bottom of the daily page). Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Where can I Find my APOD Pictures?

A3: All APODs are archived. To see any past APOD, access the archive page. This is found by clicking archive on the link line, or even by clicking Discover the Cosmos near the top of recent APOD pages. Q4: Have some APOD pictures been run more than once? A4: Yes.

Who writes the APOD text?

Q16: Who writes the APOD text? A16: Robert J. Nemiroff and Jerry T. Bonnell have written most every APOD. Starting in 2020, APOD has occasionally run text written by volunteers. In general, volunteers are professional astronomers. APOD occasionally reuses APOD text, in part to avoid restating a point that has been well-stated on APOD before.

How can I see a higher resolution version of a particular APOD?

Q7a: How can I see a higher-resolution version of a particular APOD? A7a: Clicking on the picture itself brings up the highest resolution version of the image available from APOD. It is possible that higher resolution versions exist. To find these you should follow the informative links in the APOD text.

Is APOD available as a book?

Q11: Is APOD available as a book? A11: Selections from APODs daily pages have been compiled into two books titled Universe: 365 Days (May 1, 2003) and Astronomy: 365 Days (October 1, 2006) - Publisher: Harry N Abrams.

Will APOD soon run out of pictures?

Q15: Wont APOD soon run out of pictures? A15: Probably not. NASA has archived literally hundreds of thousands of space and astronomy related pictures and APOD readers have come to submit many images for our consideration. So far, we have more good pictures than we can run.

Can I use APOD Pictures in my classroom?

Q8: Can I use APOD pictures in my classroom? A8: For non-commercial fair use, yes. Please note that many APOD images have are copyrighted and so to use them commercially you must gain explicit permission from the copyright owners. Many times, these copyright owners can be found by following the links provided under the APOD image (s).

How do I submit my picture to APOD?

The best way to show us your picture is to load it onto a web page and send us the URL. Please note that by submitting your image to APOD, you are consenting for your image to be used on APOD in all of its forms, including mirror sites, foreign language mirror sites, and direct APOD derivative products.

Q9: Can I use your APOD images for my brochure? A9: Many APOD images are copyrighted and so to use them you must write to the copyright owners for explicit permission. Many times, these copyright owners can be found by following the links provided under the APOD image (s).

What does APOD stand for?

A1: APOD stands for the Astronomy Picture of the Day. We abbreviate this as APOD instead of ApotD because APOD sounds better (spoken: AYE-pod). Q2: How can I easily see yesterdays APOD? A2: Click the < less than sign < at the left of todays APOD link line (near the bottom of the daily page). Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago? A3: All APODs are archived. To see any past APOD, access the archive page. This is found by clicking archive on the link line, or even by clicking Discover the Cosmos near the top of recent APOD pages.

What is the name of the APOD book series?

A11: Selections from APODs daily pages have been compiled into two books titled Universe: 365 Days (May 1, 2003) and Astronomy: 365 Days (October 1, 2006) - Publisher: Harry N Abrams. Q12: Is APOD available as a CD?

What is the APOD Archive?

The APOD archivecontains the largest collection of annotated astronomical images on the internet. In real life, Bob and Jerry are two professional astronomers who spend most of their time researching the universe.

Why do I need to submit my image to APOD?

Please note that by submitting your image to APOD, you are consenting for your image to be used on APOD in all of its forms, including mirror sites, foreign language mirror sites, and direct APOD derivative products. Some of these, like Facebook, carry advertising.

How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago? A3: All APODs are archived. To see any past APOD, access the archive page. This is found by clicking archive on the link line, or even by clicking Discover the Cosmos near the top of recent APOD pages.

How can I see a higher resolution version of a particular APOD?

Q7a: How can I see a higher-resolution version of a particular APOD? A7a: Clicking on the picture itself brings up the highest resolution version of the image available from APOD. It is possible that higher resolution versions exist. To find these you should follow the informative links in the APOD text.

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